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Thoughts on snow

by Greg Krehbiel on 3 February 2010

Since we’re getting more than a normal amount this year.

+ It seems to me that people who like the snow are more playful and more tolerant of small inconveniences than people who hate it. IOW, people who hate the snow strike me as being a little grouchy. I don’t know if that’s fair, but when somebody says they hate snow, that’s what I assume.

+ I’ve always wanted to get a pair of these L.L. Bean boots for snow, but we get so little of it (generally speaking) that it doesn’t seem worth the money.

LL Bean Boots

L.L. Bean Boots

+ According to Meditations on the cold (which is only mildly worth your time) …

Lovers of snow and cold are qualitatively different from the lovers of sun and surf; they are different moral beings altogether.

Hmm. I wonder where that puts me, since I love the cold and snow as well as the sun and surf — and the rain and the fog and the drizzle. I simply like weather, and I like being out in it.

+ A snow storm, or a cold winter (or hot summer), has nothing to do with global warming.

-- 2010-02-03  »  Greg Krehbiel

Talkback x 14

  1. Craig
    3 February 2010 @ 12:31 pm

    I got a pair of those about 16 years ago; worn them less than a dozen times. Live in the same general region you do.
    My college roommate had a pair – he was from new england. He found a way to wear them in North Carolina!

  2. Pigweed
    3 February 2010 @ 1:45 pm

    I agree. Snow haters only see the inconvenience. These people tend to be those who gripe about being inconvenienced in general.

    I see being locked indoors as my excuse to avoid many responsibilities, make some soup, read a book and begin drinking early.

    The bar at the Cross Street Market gets packed with people who walk there who normally wouldn’t be interested in walking that far. My kind of people.

  3. Greg Krehbiel Greg Krehbiel
    3 February 2010 @ 1:47 pm

    Is that the market with the huge beer cups? It’s worth a little walk. :-)

  4. Pigweed
    3 February 2010 @ 2:16 pm

    32 oz. beer, 4 bucks. It tastes even better after you’ve worked for it by trudging through the snow.

  5. Greg Krehbiel Greg Krehbiel
    3 February 2010 @ 2:22 pm

    What a deal!

    Sometimes when I’m out and about in cold and/or wet weather I think about the pleasure of coming home, putting my feet in front of the fire, and having something warm and alcoholic to warm me.

    The truth is that I don’t have a fireplace, and houses these days are so warm, before I could prepare something warm to drink I’m already plenty comfortable.

  6. pentamom pentamom
    3 February 2010 @ 2:46 pm

    Some of us live in climates where the inconvenience of snow is something you have to deal with week in, week out, over a time span of as much as seven months (much less frequently in some of those months, though.) And you don’t GET to stay in and do other stuff unless it’s a once in ten years kind of storm — everything still stays open and functioning and you and your kids are expected to show up and be there almost no matter how scary driving gets.

    That’s why I hate snow. If it were about shoveling, or not being able to go places, it wouldn’t bother me a bit. When it’s about taking your life in your hands or thousands of dollars worth of vehicle damage, dozens of times over the course of a winter, I mind. Guess that makes me grumpy. :-P

  7. Greg Krehbiel Greg Krehbiel
    3 February 2010 @ 2:49 pm

    I’ll buy that. So people in Maryland who hate snow are grouches!

  8. Pigweed
    3 February 2010 @ 3:02 pm

    Yes, Pentamom, I too concede your point. Here it’s a few days of inconvenience, 2 or 3 times a year. I watch footage of the upper Midwest and think, “How do they do it?” That would make me grumpy indeed.

  9. John Krehbiel John K
    3 February 2010 @ 6:04 pm

    “When the rain comes
    they run and hide their heads.
    They might as well be dead
    when the rain comes.

    When the sun shines
    they slip into the shade
    and sip their lemonade.
    When the sun shines.”

    ISTM that if you live in an area that gets a very large amount of snow and it is still an inconvenience, then you haven’t taken the proper preparatory steps. (ducks behind desk)

    And I want boots like that, even if I only wear them twice a year.

  10. pentamom pentamom
    3 February 2010 @ 8:43 pm

    What are the “proper preparatory steps” that prevent other people from driving like idiots? That make you not feel really, really cold when you have to go ut and it’s 25 degrees and snow is blowing in your face? That change the laws of physics so that even when you’re driving really carefully, you can avoid all risk of sliding through a stop sign?

  11. pentamom pentamom
    3 February 2010 @ 8:45 pm

    It’s fine to say you should have snow shovels and warm clothes and snow tires (if you can afford them) and what-all, but that doesn’t make it not an inconvenience to deal with the realities of day-in, day-out icy or unplowed roads or sub-zero windchills.

  12. John Krehbiel JohnK
    4 February 2010 @ 1:19 pm

    I was kidding.

    Sheesh!

    To be fair, I usually don’t have to worry about snow at all since I am a teacher. I can afford to just let it melt.

  13. pentamom pentamom
    5 February 2010 @ 2:00 pm

    Sorry for overreacting! It’s a sore point — I was in an accident last year and have some friends who nearly had the mom and all four kids wiped out (they had nothing worse than bumps and cuts because the tractor cab missed them by THAT much but forced them into the guard rail) a couple of years ago. Both were weather-related and neither were avoidable — there were about 15 cars by the side and middle of the road when I chose to kiss the barrier instead of the semi-trailer on the other side. So I’m still a little touchy.

    Yeah, but you’re a teacher in Maryland. If you were a teacher in the northern half of Pennsylvania, especially in an urban district, you’d have to go out in it anyway, unless you got a couple of feet at a time. I guess that’s my point!

  14. Pigweed Pigweed
    7 February 2010 @ 12:22 am

    Hi Pentamom, we just got hammered by this storm. It’s Saturday night and so beautiful and so much fun but by midweek I think I’m gonna be really tired of this.